New wearable device opens doors for cruise industry

New wearable device opens doors for cruise industry

Carnival's Ocean Medallion controls all aspects of the passenger experience

Carnival's Ocean Medallion controls all aspects of the passenger experience

The Ocean Medallion devices have multiple functions, including opening doors
The Ocean Medallion devices have multiple functions, including opening doors

A new wearable passenger device has been developed that is set to transform the cruise industry.

Unveiled by Carnival Corporation at the CES 2017 technology event in Las Vegas, the new ‘Ocean Medallion’ is a  wearable “smart” device that allows passengers to find their way around the ship, access their rooms, locate friends and family, make onboard purchases, set F&B preferences, and interact with crew members.

The 51 gram disc can be worn anywhere on the person, including as a watch or necklace, or can simply be carried in a pocket.

“With this interactive technology platform, we are poised to have our global cruise line brands at the vanguard of forever changing the guest experience paradigm – not just in the cruise industry but in the larger vacation market and potentially other industries,” said Carnival’s CEO, Arnold Donald. “Now we are in prime position to take the guest experience to a level never before considered possible.”

The Ocean Medallion harnesses a network of sensors and computing devices embedded throughout the ship, ports and destinations that collectively form the “Experience Innovation Operating System”, or xiOS. The xiOS leverages hardware and software to personalise all aspects of the passenger experience, including access, lodging, F&B, entertainment, retail, navigation, payment and media.

The new concept will debut on Princess Cruises’ Regal Princess cruise ship in November 2017, followed by Royal Princess and Caribbean Princess in 2018. A new ‘Medallion Class’ will be progressively rolled out across the entire Princess Cruises fleet over the coming years.

Mark Elliott
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Mark Elliott
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